Clay Rivers
Editorial director, Our Human Family. Racial equality and faith. @clayrivers

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The new book by Our Human Family

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“Fieldnotes on Allyship,” the new book by Our Human Family.

The Recap

In the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd, people are speaking out against systemic racism and the killing of Black Americans by law enforcement officers. Unprecedented numbers of people—of all demographics—are participating in peaceful marches and demonstrations in support of Black Lives Matter across the country. There are many more who want to get involved, but demonstrations are not an option. And they’re unsure what to do.

The Book

Fieldnotes on Allyship: Achieving Equality Together is an informal and informative guide to becoming an effective ally and covers four areas: 1) how we as a nation got here, 2) identifying the forces that maintain systemic racism, 3) preparing to be an ally, and 4) serving as an ally. …


Volume 2, Number 36

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Photo by cloudvisual on Unsplash

The past forty-six months have been a path littered with strained relationships, broken friendships, and a scattering of stopped, blocked, and unfollowed social media contacts loosely dubbed friends, not to mention those we encounter in person — all sacrificed on the altar of politics. What remains is a basket full of like-minded individuals and probably a couple of dissenters who consider it best to keep their mouths shut. …


If Black people could’ve remedied the problem single-handedly, we would have. A long time ago.

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“Fieldnotes on Allyship: Achieving Equality Together,” an informal and informational guide to becoming an ally by Our Human Family.

Summer 2020, people the world over learned the United States’ ugly secret known by Black people in this country for 400 years: Black lives are regarded as having little to no value. And for any Black person who dares challenge this worldview, retribution can be sure, swift, and deadly.

In 1919, fifty-four years after the abolition of the enslavement of Black Americans and thirty-nine years after Black men were granted the right to vote, July Perry led a voter registration campaign for the Black residents of Ocoee, Florida. …

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